a parliament of owls

life with asperger's

Tag: gender

Gender Dysphoria and Bodily Estrangement

A small study based in a gender dysphoria clinic has just found that “almost a quarter of kids with gender dysphoria” are “likely to have Asperger’s.” At least one other study has found that people with Aspergers have higher than baseline rates of the same. Few people who are wired conventionally are aware of how much that wiring affects a basic sense of self, such as one’s relationship to the body. For me, the body is an alien entity, a vehicle that carries my consciousness even as it synthesizes and synergizes its production. Without a neurologically based rewards system for social thinking or feeling, I also have no additional inclination to conform to received views about the body or how I should relate to it. Therefore, my sense of gender and sexuality is based on my partially independently formed concept of these rather than the vehicle or what I’ve taken in about it from others directly or via media.

From a very early age, I did not identify as female, and I often feel a negative response to social conventions that attempt to identify me as one (such as the label “Mrs” or being called a “mother,” when I am only my son’s mother and my marital state does not define me any more than it does a “Mr.”). I am also equally attracted to males and females and have been for as long as I can remember. But physical touch, presence, and relations are unimportant to me, and in some ways undesirable unless I already have significant emotional intimacy with the other person. I find that other Aspies vary to the degree to which they would say the same, but there’s a tendency toward all of this in us that I believe is shared.

I remember with what joy of recognition I responded to a question on one of the extensive diagnostic inventories I took during my medical diagnosis for autism. It asked something about whether I was sometimes uncomfortable with having arms because I didn’t know how to position them or what to do with them. I had never told that to anyone and couldn’t believe anyone could imagine the same enough to ask another if that were the case.

One artist who does express this sense of bodily estrangement is David Byrne, also a self-described Aspie. If you are interested in this, read his lyrics to “Glass, Concrete, and Stone.” Here’s a taste:

Skin that covers me from head to toe
Except a couple tiny holes and openings
Where the city’s blowin’ in and out
And this is what it’s all about, delightfully

Everything’s possible when you’re an animal
Not inconceivable, how things can change, I know

‪#‎aspergers‬ ‪#‎autism‬ ‪#‎genderdysphoria‬

The Asperger’s Closet: On Coming Out

My brother chose the night of my high school graduation to come out to our father, who had raised us after the divorce. I was the younger child, and the black sheep to my brother’s shining sun; the day had finally been about me. After the speeches (I’d given one), and the interminable procession, we’d be allowed to go out for Mexican, which counted as exotic fare in our small town as late as the summer of ’84, something my father usually wouldn’t tolerate (the food along with the people). We’d come home and were having one of our long “family talks” around the dining room table, the kind where my father ranted for hours, full of black Irish emotion and passionate philosophy, weaving the story of his life with ours, or his version of it.

We can tell each other anything, he said. We share our truths. I wasn’t sharing mine, not any of them. I was sitting quietly listening, enmeshed in the family dynamic that was built more on myth than fact. Into this fiction my brother intruded his truth, that he is gay, that he had always been gay, that he had been experimenting while away that year at college. He was ready to own it. I had known since we hit puberty, and I was glad, relieved, that he had decided to come out. Coming out is never easy. But his timing was terrible. My night of celebration turned into a trauma.

My father’s agony was real. One of his two adult best friends, my Uncle Dick, was a gay man who had been murdered in a hate crime years before–well, pulled from his car after his windshield had been hit with a brick and assaulted until he fell into a coma; he later died of his injuries. They had never spoken of Uncle Dick’s same-sex attraction, and, my father said, that had made their friendship possible. With this unwelcome truth out now between my father and his son, something unspeakable had been said. Something that wasn’t shared even between men like brothers, certainly not between father and son. It doomed his son to death. It put an insurmountable barrier between them. On every level, it literally and without exaggeration terrified him.

Therefore, on the night of my high school graduation, my father somehow found the God he had rejected so that he could punish my brother with Him. In the years that came after, they continued to struggle. My brother argued that my father should accept him completely, and my father argued that he never would. He could love my brother, but not that part of him. He knew my brother, but could never know all of him. At their closest moment during those after years, my father even helped to move my brother and his lover (an Army nurse) into their new place out of state. But there was always something gone wrong at bottom, and the uneasy truce wasn’t bound to last. During that move, they got into a terrible fight over something incidental, like who was unpacking slower or driving too fast to follow. Conclusion was, my father raced home afraid my brother was going to use the spare key to our childhood home to get into the house to kill him. He changed the locks. They haven’t spoken again. Not as far as I know; I’m not speaking to either of them.

My coming out has been different and much less traumatic than my brother’s, but it, too, carries a gift and a price. I’m not talking about coming out with an alternative sexuality, but with an alternative identity just the same: disclosing to people that I have Asperger’s, or high functioning autism, or asd.

If I were a gay man, people would be inclined to believe me when I told them so. With Asperger’s, a common reaction is skepticism. The person I’m telling has a relative or a friend of theirs has a relative who is a classic autistic. I don’t fit that stereotype. I’m verbal and don’t sit on the floor rocking (although if I stand long enough a rotate, or swing my torso, from side to side–something we call stimming). Or, they think of the socially incapable uber-nerd who is male, but here I am, a woman. I seem to have social graces (seeming is believing). I can make eye contact (admittedly, too much). I can make small talk (not often or for long). Or, they just flat out believe that Aspies are unicorns, invented out of some bizarre inclination toward wish fulfillment, maybe a desire to be special, to find a label for introversion or eccentricity that has a certain clinical ring to it, as if by making such a claim virgins will want to ride us and the forest of twilit dreams will be ours and ours alone to roam.

Sometimes, when people do believe, even then they might express that it’s not a big deal. They’ve got friends who are geeky-nerdy- introverted-techy-socially awkward-brainy people–maybe even on the shy side. I’m not shy, I tell them. I’m not reticent. I’m what they call “active but odd.” Hang around me long enough, or do away with one of the many interactive scripts I’ve learned to run, and prepare to be — well, it depends on your tastes and maybe my mood. Charmed. Stumped. Annoyed. Amused. Uncomfortable. There’s a range of reaction depending on our chemistry. And it’s not that I enjoy rejection or that I’m impervious to it, but I care much less about it than a socially normative person might. I’ve got rigidities. Obsessions and collections (a hoard in the skull). Sensitivities to stimuli. Imagine a cat with its back up, making that Halloween cat face of alarm. I’ve got one of those inside my nervous system, ready to jerk upright just behind my face at any given moment. It happened today in a meeting, when someone dropped something with a crash. I jump and grimace. Twitching. I have to concentrate to resettle. Literally, the surface of my skin stings all over, arms, legs, chest.

I’m different, and finally someone sees. One day, not long ago, a woman at my new job was teasing me. She’d found me sitting alone in a meeting room, waiting for the thing to begin. I always try to be on time, or a little before, and I do it even in a place where people have a culture of running a little late. They’ve told me they run late there. But it doesn’t matter to me. I have developed an internal standard that punctuality is polite, and therefore I do it regardless of others’ social expectations. So she is teasing me, saying that I must be so lonely, so very lonely, sitting there all alone in my aloneness. Party of one. Loner. I’m reminded of that scene in the Steven Martin movie (The Lonely Guy) where he sits down in a restaurant to eat alone, feels self-conscious, and the universe fantastically manifests his self-consciousness as a spotlight shining down only on him. But I am not lonely. I don’t care that I am the only one in the room. I have plenty to think about, and I often bring something to read, anyway, just in case I run out of interesting thoughts. I tell her, to stop her from interrupting my thoughts and for Gods’ sake emoting at me in that too loud, cheerful-neighbor-over-the-fence voice, that I am not at all lonely, and that I don’t get lonely, not in the way she means. I don’t generally long for other people. I only ever miss particular other people, and then sometimes, not always. There was something in the way I asserted this that made her pause. She understood, I could tell, that there was something new in the room with her, something she wasn’t used to encountering in the daily course of her life.

Glimpses like that into another person’s awareness of my difference are validating. Not because I want to be different, but because I am different from most people. I can’t help but be keenly aware of this in my every interaction with strangers or people of limited acquaintance. It doesn’t make me an object of pity to myself. I am not a victim. I am not necessarily Aspie proud, either. It is what I am; it’s not something I’ve achieved. The moment when I move from self-awareness to advocacy is the moment when I sense someone has recognized my difference and rejected it. That someone might not realize he or she is rejecting Asperger’s. It’s akin to a conventional heterosexual finding an effeminate man or masculine woman distasteful. I seem like something they recognize, except there’s something else about me that’s too remote, or blunt, or analytical, or serious, or intense. I’m staring at nothing with an unfocused gaze, or my interest in manifesting fake cheer has dwindled (all too easily and often). Then that someone recognizes a distasteful difference, without getting all the way to giving it a label. And if I gave that kind of person a label to explain it, would that render me more palatable to them? Or would they believe instead that there is some kind of medication that could help me to conform or therapy that could fix me?

It wasn’t that long ago that a woman to whom I’d revealed my Asperger’s made that very suggestion, that there must be some kind of therapy. Yes, Aspies sometimes benefit from social skills training or motor skills development or cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety. Some of us take medication to help with anxiety or depression. But the fact is, we’re born this way–whether others believe us, accept us, or reject us. Baby, as Lady Gaga would say, we’re born this way. We’re freaks and geeks.

Just as with my brother’s experience in coming out, however, the most important reaction to difference is one’s own. It has taken me years to understand myself as someone with Asperger’s, to accept that Asperger’s is a form of autism, and even to acknowledge that this may put me at a disadvantage in certain contexts, despite my intelligence, ability, and confidence. And lately, I’ve been coming to a different place still.

These days, my Asperger’s is seeming less like private information, something I can only confess about my son in order to help him gain support services at school. We have a lot of positive talk in our home about what it means to be Aspie; we’ve come to admire the gifts, laugh at the quirks, and shrug at the deficits. So maybe there is some real value in coming out–not as much to the neurotypical world in the hope that we’ll eventually gain understanding and acceptance, although that’s something to shoot for, but so that we can embrace one another and come to a greater understanding and acceptance of ourselves.

This, then, becomes the foundation on which we stand to face the world.

Claiming Asperger’s

Many people are wondering aloud these days about why they are hearing so much about autism in general and Asperger’s in particular. It’s legitimate to question why, and whether it’s always been around and in such prevalence. In March of this year, a new U.S. government report claimed that 1 in 50 school children are on the spectrum, higher yet than the 1 in 88 reported in a different report the year before. The March report was based on 100,000 parent surveys, which may be more suggestive of increased diagnoses and request for services than an increase in actual numbers of cases. Even so, the relatively large number of diagnoses raises the concern that autism spectrum disorders are a fad. Within the high-functioning autism community, one effect of this concern is that officially diagnosed autistics or those who love them go after those who are self-identified.

I am a self-identified high-functioning autistic. I do not yet have an official medical diagnosis, although my son has been officially diagnosed. As I describe in an earlier post, I first came to realize I share his diagnosis during the process of developing it in cooperation with staff at a local university psychological services center. I’ve tested this against the Baron-Cohen Autism Spectrum Quotient, which is a diagnostic inventory developed at the Autism Research Centre at the University of Cambridge; it’s so popularized now, it’s even appeared in Wired. Any score of 32 or higher is suggestive of ASD. I consistently score over that. My last evaluation two days ago placed me at 36. I’m now in the process of seeking a medical diagnosis, which I have put off because I had not needed it previously, being well adapted to work and life in general. Besides, achieving a diagnosis for a developmental condition like Asperger’s is no quick feat. It means an initial hour consultation followed by four two-hour testing sessions, as well as completing a long self-assessment questionnaire. And it’s not free; I’m fortunate to have the means to do it through employer-provided health insurance.

It can also be difficult to find a clinician who has expertise in and the availability to do adult Asperger’s assessments. Most clinicians are geared to assess children, which is understandable given that it is a developmental issue that can impact academic success and psychosocial progress. Those of us who seek adult diagnoses now were raised in generations when there was less clinical and social awareness of high-functioning autism, and certainly even that much less awareness again that females might be so diagnosed. Males are still much more frequently diagnosed (at a ratio of 4:1 with autism in general and 9:1 with Asperger’s), perhaps in large part because the main diagnostic criteria for Asperger’s was originally based on cases of boys alone.

Temple Grandin, now a famous instance of a woman with Asperger’s, as well as Judy Endow, an advocate on the spectrum, have both made progress in dispelling the myth that high-functioning autism is a boys’ club. Good work has also been done in recent years on the differences between male and female high-functioning autistics, especially by Tony Atwood. It’s in reading Atwood’s work on girls and women with Asperger’s that I had once again that shock of self-recognition I had experienced during my son’s diagnostic process. Once again I realized that so many of the characteristics I had thought were unique to myself were shared by others on the spectrum, this time female others.

Here’s one striking example: Much has been made of boy’s Asperger’s culture revolving around obsessions with trains, legos, and video games. My own son, now 12, continues to be absorbed in video games and, when he was younger, shared an equal absorption in trains and legos. People outside of the high-functioning autistic community might be quick to say that all boys tend to like these things, but the distinction is in the degree. Boys on the spectrum often show an interest in trains, legos, and video games to the exclusion of any other forms of play (except perhaps other mechanical or construction sets), any other kinds of interests (except a limited number of other obsessions, such as construction machines or insects or extreme weather phenomena), or any other topics of discussion. Girls on the spectrum, according to Atwood, often project themselves into reading, instead, and especially reading in the genre of fantasy. He reasons that girls on the spectrum find power in fantasy, identifying with characters who overcome through their special abilities, as well as finding in fantasy worlds a safe haven from social anxiety. By the time I had finished middle school, I had read Tolkien’s Middle Earth works, including the Silmarillion, seventeen times. I had read his letters and many books on his work, the myths on which they were based, and a biography. I had even kept an encrypted journal in Elvish script. And then, years later, there was a doctorate in British literature with a specialization in fairy tale and fantasy literature. In one of his books, Atwood even names literature professor as a common and effective career choice for women with Asperger’s. My hands shook when I held that book, reading what I had always taken to be the happenstance story of myself told with unlikely accuracy.

I can understand the desire of those already diagnosed with high-functioning autism to want to protect the value of the diagnosis from seeming to apply to everyone who has social anxiety or introversion or a certain nerdy or geeky turn. There seems to be some confusion about how these other qualities differ from this specific developmental condition, which can itself present in subtly nuanced ways across personalities. But I also think it’s okay for people to wonder if this diagnosis applies to them, to be Asperger’s curious or questioning, to use an analogy to LGBT culture. And I think that for many and maybe even most people, the journey to accepting a diagnosis is not an easy one, not when the diagnosis is understood as a potential set of costs as well as benefits. Eccentricity may be charming in short bursts, and adopting an eccentric pose may be fun in certain circumstances, but to be an eccentric by neurological fiat when one desires to be accepted, liked, and even unremarked and remarkable is an uncomfortable thing. There may be those of us on the spectrum who ultimately wear the diagnosis as if it were a badge of honor, who might take it as a point of pride to be different and therefore special, but this is itself an act of bravery and perhaps of defiance from those who have no choice but to live on the social fringe.